About Lavender

Lavender is native to the mountainous zones of the Mediterranean where it grows in sunny, stony habitats. Lavender is a heavily branched short shrub that grows to a height of roughly 60 centimeters (about 24 inches). Its broad root stock bears woody branches with upright, rod like, leafy, green shoots. A silvery down covers the gray green narrow leaves, which are oblong and tapered, attached directly at the base, and curled spirally.The oil in lavender's small, blue violet flowers gives the herb its fragrant scent. The flowers are arranged in spirals of 6 - 10 blossoms, forming interrupted spikes above the foliage.

Many people appreciate lavender (Lavandula angustifolia, or Lavandula officinalis) for its fragrance, used in soaps, shampoos, and sachets for scenting clothes. The name lavender comes from the Latin root lavare, which means "to wash." Lavender may have earned this name because it was frequently used in baths to help purify the body and spirit. However, this herb has also been used as a remedy for a range of ailments from insomnia and anxiety to depression and fatigue. Research has confirmed that lavender produces slight calming, soothing, and sedative effects when its scent is inhaled.

Lavender essential oil is still the most popular oil in aromatherapy . The aroma is very calming and relaxing and it is often used to treat insomnia. Many commercial air fresheners contain lavender and it is a common ingredient in household products, including cleaners that take advantage of its antiseptic properties. Many lavender soaps, lotions, creams and other products are hand made by small scale cottage manufacturers.